Quick take: The Fujifilm X-Pro

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As I mentioned in last night’s post, I’m currently in the midst of trying out a new every day camera system. The truth is that a lot of my paid photography work will continue to be done on the Samsung NX cameras, I am starting to try out some new cameras in hopes that I find one that fits my style of shooting and personal style as well. Enter the FujiFilm X-Pro (the original).

The Fujifilm X-Pro was originally released in 2012 and has since been updated by the X-Pro 2 but with a $1700 body-only price tag, I decided on spending far less for the older version before making such a large commitment. So here’s what I bought (specs):

Fujifilm X-Pro 1

  • 16-megapixel APS-C CMOS sensor
  • 3-inch fixed LCD display
  • Native ISO range from 200-6400
  • EXR Pro Image Processor
  • 1/4000 second maximum shutter speed
  • hybrid optical/electronic viewfinder
  • rangefinder style mirrorless body
  • Fujifilm film simulation mode for JPEGs

The gallery above is a small compilation of images taken over the past couple of days with the Fujifilm X-Pro 1. I’ve mostly spent the couple of days getting a feel for the camera, learning where everything is and where all the menu commands/settings can be found. Although I don’t recommend anyone rely too heavily on filters (Instagram or VSCO) they definitely have a place and Fujifilm’s film simulation mode allows you to create processed-in-camera JPEGs that look very close to some of Fujifilm’s iconic 35mm films.

So far my favorite aspect of the X-Pro 1 is the overall construction of the camera and its rangefinder style. In my heart of hearts I want a Leica M but the way my bank account is set up, the Fujifilm X-Pro makes for more than a capable alternative. The camera is solidly built without being too heavy or bulky despite it’s dimensions. Though it’s not fully pocketable, it’s nowhere near as obtrusive as a full-sized DSLR making it a great performer out in real-world use.

I haven’t gotten around to working with the RAW files yet though I do intend on working on those this week. I’m confident that a modern 16-megapixel camera can handle a little bit of pushing in Lightroom; look for my full break down in a future post.

Breaking up is hard to do

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One of the most important feature on any camera for 99% (pardon the hyperbole) is familiarity. Knowing where everything is. Knowing how everything works. Knowing how your gear reacts in various conditions is absolutely crucial for making great photographs. I’ve been shooting with Samsung cameras exclusively for over 2 years and I knew my cameras down to their most obscure detail. As you’ve guessed from the title to this post and my constant use of the past tense, I will no longer be shooting with Samsung cameras – and it’s not by choice. Continue reading